Java is more a platform than a language

News

Thorsten Heller is positive that Java as a platform with different programming language such as Java itself, Kotlin, Scala, etc. won’t drop in relevance or popularity.

An interview with Greenbird CEO Thorsten Heller was published on the JAX blog, in connection with the upcoming JAX London conference.

JAX London is a Conference for JAVA & Software Innovation. The event brings together the world’s leading innovators in the fields of JAVA, micro services, continuous delivery and DevOps.

Check out the original JAX blog post 

Some people seem to believe that Node.js might have a chance at overtaking Java in the near future. Can Java really be dethroned? Why/why not?

Yes and no. I’m convinced that Java might be dethroned or at least challenged in the near future but I won’t bet on Node.js. If I would have to, I’d put some money on Kotlin. Its simplicity, lean syntax, functional approach – just some of the features – will boost its popularity. And maybe boost cleaner code? In general, I’m sure the near future will nevertheless be more heterogeneous: the best fitting programming language for a given task. For me, Java is more of a platform than a language.

 

This year, Stanford’s famous introductory course for programming dropped Java in favor of JavaScript. What does this say about the relevance and popularity of Java?

The first steps might be easier with Javascript, so I’d assume that’s Stanford’s motivation for dropping Java. Getting people even faster up and running and giving them quickly some moments of success. Nevertheless, Java as a platform with different programming language such as Java itself, Kotlin, Scala, etc. won’t drop in relevance or popularity. The Java platform is and will be the enterprise platform of the future.

“I’M CONVINCED THAT JAVA MIGHT BE DETHRONED OR AT LEAST CHALLENGED IN THE NEAR FUTURE BUT I WON’T BET ON NODE.JS”


What did you think of the fact that Java 9 was delayed to September? Do you agree with the JCP Executive Committee’s decision not to approve the Public Review Ballot for JSR 376?

I totally agree with the JCP Executive Committee’s decision to vote against JSR 376. It absolutely makes no sense for me to introduce a specification with so many open issues or unclear topics. Especially the delineation and co-existence with OSGi is one of the aspects I’m concerned. So postponing Java 9 and reworking the specification was a smart decision.


“IF I WOULD HAVE TO, I’D PUT SOME MONEY ON KOTLIN”


Georges Saab, chairperson of the OpenJDK governing board and vice president of development for the Java Platform Group at Oracle told JAXenter in early June that many developers will probably get started on JDK 9 without modules. How do you feel about the modular ecosystem?

To be honest, I’m still a split mind regarding the module system and Java 9 and how it relates and works together with OSGi. I wouldn’t have big issues right now to drop the whole module system in Java 9 to focus on other aspects.    

 

What is the most important misconception about Java 9?

For me, there are two “MOST” important misconceptions: The Maven discussion (meaning that Maven etc. won’t work) and the need to port all code over to the new module system.

 

What would you like to see in Java 10?

More focus on “built-in” DevOps support in the core Java Platform.